Last edited by Gujinn
Monday, May 4, 2020 | History

2 edition of Women nurses with the Union forces during the Civil War found in the catalog.

Women nurses with the Union forces during the Civil War

Julia C. Stimson

Women nurses with the Union forces during the Civil War

by Julia C. Stimson

  • 122 Want to read
  • 31 Currently reading

Published by s.n. in [S.l .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Military nursing -- United States.,
  • United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Hospitals.,
  • United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Women.

  • Edition Notes

    Other titlesMilitary surgeon. Jan.-Feb. 1928.
    Statementby Julia C. Stimson and Ethel C.S. Thompson.
    SeriesAdelaide Nutting historical nursing collection -- AN 1085.
    ContributionsThompson, Ethel C. S.
    The Physical Object
    FormatMicroform
    Pagination40 p.
    Number of Pages40
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL16550210M

      During the four decades between the Civil War and the beginning of the twentieth century, the image of nurses moved from being viewed as somewhat less than honorable to a respected profession. The next century would bring still more changes, and nurses of the 19 th century would scarcely recognize the occupation as it is in the 21 st century. Nurses, both women and men, worked for the Union Army in hospitals and on battlefields. Though most had no formal training, they provided care and comfort to thousands of soldiers and civilians. Susie King Taylor and Ann Stokes were former slaves who gained their freedom as the Union took over Confederate strongholds in the South.

    She traveled to Washington and became Superintendent of Women Nurses for the Union. Many people were appalled at the idea of a female nurse working in a military hospital surrounded by men. Civil War Times Illustra no. 9 (): Stevens, Bryna. Frank Thompson, Her Life and Times: A Civil War Story. New York: Macmillan, Surveillant This is the biography of a woman -- S. Emma E. Edmonds -- "who, disguised as a man, moved behind Confederate lines to spy for the Union during the Civil War." 3. Harriet Tubman.

      Two women in the Atlanta area provided detailed accounts of civilian life there through the upheaval and dislocation brought on by Union forces in Mary Harris Gay of Decatur in Life in Dixie during the War (), and Sallie Clayton, an adolescent at the time, whose memories of her own and her family's ordeal, recorded just after the turn of the century, were published in as Requiem for .   Ibid. Massey Women in the Civil War p Ibid. Massey Women in the Civil War pp. Ibid. Massey Women in the Civil War p Ibid. Guelzo Fateful Lightening p Sizer, Lyde Cullen Acting Her Part: Narratives of Union Women Spies in Divided Houses: Gender and the Civil War Oxford University Press, New York and Oxford p


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Women nurses with the Union forces during the Civil War by Julia C. Stimson Download PDF EPUB FB2

During the Civil War, more than five thousand women served the Union cause as army nurses. In Mary Gardner Holland collected these reminiscences, reprinted here for the first time.

In this book, you will read the stories of one hundred of these women, often in their own voice/5(6). Some experienced female nurses served, such as Catholic nuns, but any matronly, responsible woman could qualify during the Civil War.

The escalating war required still more medical staff, and in the Union Army allowed surgeons to choose their own nurses. Get this from a library. Women nurses with the Union forces during the Civil War. [Julia C Stimson; Ethel C S Thompson]. Wedded to War (Heroines Behind the Lines Civil War Book One) Charlotte Waverly leaves a life of privilege, wealth–and confining expectations–to be one of the first female nurses for the Union Army.

She quickly discovers that she’s fighting more than just the Rebellion by working in the hospitals. Women Nurses of the Civil War Introduction by Mrs. John A. Logan The hospitals established by the Empress Helena in the fifth century were an evidence of Christian feeling; and it was the same Christianity and humanity which actuated Margaret Fuller and Florence Nightingale when in Italy and in the Crimean War they nursed the wounded soldiers.

Louisa May Alcott. Louisa May Alcott is known worldwide as the author of Little Women, but less known is the fact that she served as a volunteer nurse during the civil war, seeing action in the battle of Fredericksburg.

Civil War Nurses Articles From History Net Magazines. Civil. Expanding the Role of Women as Nurses During the American Civil War Article (PDF Available) in ANS. Advances in nursing science 32(1) January with 1, ReadsAuthor: Rhonda Goodman.

One of the best-documented female soldiers is Sarah Edmonds—her alias was Frank Thompson. She was a Union soldier and worked during the Civil War as a nurse.

(© Bettmann / Corbis)Author: Jess Righthand. Women of the Confederacy. White women in the South threw themselves into the war effort with the same zeal as their Northern counterparts. The Confederacy had less money and fewer resources than. Women played many roles in the Civil did not sit idly by waiting for the men in their lives to come home from the battlefield.

Many women supported the war effort as nurses and aides, while others took a more upfront approach and secretly enlisted in the army or. Nursing During the Civil War as Described by Roberta West in Her Book “History of Nursing in Pennsylvania” published by the Pennsylvania State Nurses Association in c By Jane Early, BSN, RN.

The outbreak of the Civil War in found little differences in the care of the sick and wounded than during the Revolutionary War. Letter from Sarah Blunt to her mother. Ma AHMC – Blunt, Sarah. New-York Historical Society. Raised in Pennsylvania as a Quaker, Rebecca E.

Frick temporarily put aside some of her religious beliefs to volunteer her services as a nurse during the Civil War. Frick felt very strongly that she needed to help those who were suffering.

Women were not only nurses however, Mary Chesnut keep an extensive diary during the entire war and an untold number of women, by some estimates as high asbroke more drastically with convention by disguising themselves as men and enlisting in either the Union or Confederate army as Civil War women soldiers.

Florence Nightingale also influenced American Nursing. Many of her concepts and nursing methods were used by nurses who volunteered for both the Union and the Confederate forces during the U.S.

Civil War (). Women provided casualty care and nursing to Union and Confederate troops at field hospitals and on the Union Hospital Ship Red Rover. 3 thoughts on “ Women Soldiers in the Civil War ” John Braden Novem at pm.

The best estimate of female combatants in the Civil War has been provided in John A. Braden, “Mothers of Invention: Phony Reports of Female Civil War Combatants.” in the January/February, Camp Chase Gazette (Vol.

XLII, NO. Women In The Civil War summary: There were many women playing important roles in the Civil War, including nurses, spies, soldiers, abolitionists, civil rights advocates and promoters of women’s women were engaged in supplying the troops with food, clothing, medical supplies, and even money through fundraising.

Because Emerging Civil War has been commemorating the Battle of Gettysburg, and I have been writing a series of articles about women Civil War nurses, I found a book by Sophronia E. Bucklin recollecting her experience as a Sanitary Commission Continue reading →. The Civil War wrought cataclysmic changes in the lives of American Women on both sides of the conflict.

Women in the Civil War demonstrates their enterprise, fortitude, and fierceness. In this revealing social history, Massey focuses on many famous women, including nurses Dorothea Dix, Clara Barton, and Mother Bickerdyke; spies Pauline Cushman and Belle Boyd; writers Louis/5.

“Two Brave Women” by Josephine Crump, an excerpt from the book Confederate Women of Arkansas in the Civil War, An advertisement for the book The Woman in Battle by Loreta Juaneta Velasquez, who fought for the Confederacy as Harry T.

Buford. OverAmerican men died during the Civil War. The enemy killed only one-third of those lost; two-thirds fell victim to disease.¹ This book examines the experience of Southern women who nursed sick and wounded soldiers during the war—their contributions and sacrifices, their relationships with patients, surgeons, and the home front, and ultimately their changed sense of themselves.

Women played a significant role in the Civil War. They served in a variety of capacities, as trained professional nurses giving direct medical care, as hospital administrators, or as attendants.Between 2, to 5, women volunteered as nurses during the Civil War.

According to the book "Women in the Civil War," so many women eagerly volunteered for the job, they earned a nickname from the press The Union forces outnumbered the Confederates roughly two to one.Wedded to War is a work of fiction, but the story is inspired by the true life of Civil War nurse Georgeanna Woolsey.

Woolsey's letters and journals, written over years ago, offer a thorough look of what pioneering nurses endured/5().