Last edited by Kagagar
Thursday, May 7, 2020 | History

8 edition of Divine impassibility found in the catalog.

Divine impassibility

an essay in philosophical theology

by Richard E. Creel

  • 167 Want to read
  • 3 Currently reading

Published by Cambridge University Press in Cambridge [Cambridgeshire], New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Suffering of God

  • Edition Notes

    StatementRichard E. Creel.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsBT153.S8 C74 1986
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxi, 238 p. ;
    Number of Pages238
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL3024419M
    ISBN 100521303176
    LC Control Number85004741

      Nevertheless, as this article will argue in the brief space below, divine impassibility emerges as a necessary implication of other divine attributes that are expressly set down in Holy Scripture.[2] Methodological Assumptions. In the interest of objectivity, we are taught to interpret the Bible as we would any other book, i.e., by allowing our. Classic Christian orthodoxy teaches that God is impassible — that is, not subject to suffering, pain, or involuntary passions. In the words of the Westminster Confession of Faith, God is "without body, parts, or passions, immutable." The doctrine of the passibility of God has to .

    Chapter 7 traces divine impassibility throughout salvation history and closes with an all-important discussion on the analogical nature of divine self-disclosure. Because we are made in the image of God, “the order of being (the ontology of the matter) moves from the Creator, as the point of origin, to the creature, as the reflection or image. To many readers, Confessing the Impassible God will be a surprising book. It articulates and defends the impassibility of God by Baptists, taking seriously the statements of Baptist confessions of faith of the seventeenth century! Such surprise is due largely to the custom of identifying Baptists exclusively with the culture and theology of modern evangelicalism, the temper of mind of which is Author: Paul Helm.

    One of the best books I’ve read on patristic theology is The Suffering of the Impassible God: The Dialectics of Patristic Thought by Paul L. Gavrilyuk. The book is a historical study of impassibility, an early Christian doctrine that claims God does not suffer human emotions or feelings. Gavrilyuk frames his whole argument as an apologetic toward the school of thought that he labels “The. Divine Impassibility: Four Views of God’s Emotions and Suffering (IVP Press website) Divine Impassibility: Four Views of God’s Emotions and Suffering (the book Dr. Dolezal contributes to as the strong impassibility advocate) God Without Parts: The .


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Divine impassibility by Richard E. Creel Download PDF EPUB FB2

Divine Impassibility is a crucial topic for the foundation of our understanding on the nature of God. God's impassibility or passibility, His experience of emotions and potential to change or be influenced by emotion and creation, is a topic that affects a lot of other theological concerns like sovereignty, God's will, God's faithfulness, His independence, His love and justice/5(3).

Divine Impassibility: Four Views of God's Emotions and Suffering (Spectrum Multiview Books) by Thomas Jay Oord Paperback $ Only 16 left in stock /5(3). Divine Impassibility: Four Views of God's Emotions and Suffering by Robert J. Matz. Goodreads helps you keep track Divine impassibility book books you want to read.

Start by marking “Divine Impassibility: Four Views of God's Emotions and Suffering” as Want to Read: Want to Read/5. Divine Impassibility: Four Views of God’s Emotions and Suffering addresses a fascinating look at a crucial point of theology.

Regardless of which view you may hold to, all of the contributors in this book are worthy of consideration and engagement. This is a great resource that will be of benefit to anyone’s theological library. Recommended. Divine Impassibility traces the issue of classical sources, relates the positions of nineteenth- and early twentieth-century books, and surveys the writings of contemporary British analytic philosophers such as Peter Geach, Anthony Kenny, Richard Swinburne, John Hick, and H.

Owen, American analytic philosophers such as Norman Kretzmann, Eleonore Stump, Nelson Pike, Robert 3/5. "The doctrine of divine impassibility—in some form or other—is an inheritance of the Christian tradition. It is also the subject of much disagreement and debate within recent theology.

In this book, this debate is carried forward in a vigorous and very spirited manner as arguments are made from biblical and philosophical theology even as pastoral and experiential concerns are weighed. The introduction to the book provides a chart with summary answers to each question, showing in brief the places where the four views agree and differ.

Divine impassibility book Basically, the strong impassible position would answer all of these “no,” while the strong passible position would answer all of these yes. Book Overview The book is structured as follows.

The Introduction presses home the importance of the doctrine of divine impassibility. Readers will be challenged to recognize that tinkering with divine impassibility as classically understood has implications that always end up compromising other fundamental articles of the Christian faith.

This book can be said to present an interdisciplinary exposition and so a cumulative defense of divine impassibility and of the doctrine of God of which that is an aspect. Each line of argument strengthens and supports the other. Divine impassibility, which means God does not experience suffering or emotions, is an attribute that hovers near the center of all these questions.

In exploring the subject of God’s ability or inability to suffer and feel emotions we simultaneously explore God’s relationship to the evil in the world and what God is doing about it. Divine Impassibility: A Thomistic Critique of Jürgen Moltmann’s Staurocentric Trinitarianism.

Classical Christian doctrine has always affirmed divine impassibility, that is, God, in his divine nature, does not suffer. However, this doctrine has been subjected to criticism by some modern passibilist theologians.

In the medieval treatments, impassibility generally receives a separate locus. So it is with Thomas Aquinas, to whom we now turn. I shall take the material from Chapter 89 of Book I of the Summa Contra Gentiles.

The chapter is entitled ‘That in God there are not the passions of the appetites’. It has been about fifty years since the topic of divine impassibility was the subject of book-length philosophical treatments in English.

In recent years process and analytic philosophers have returned this issue to the forefront of professional attention. Divine Impassibility traces the issue of classical sources, relates the positions of nineteenth- and early twentieth-century books, and.

Divine Impassibility. by R. Sproul. (whereby the Father suffers in the death of Christ), or the theopaschatist heresy (whereby the divine nature of Christ suffers and dies on the cross) in order to affirm the reality of affection in God.

If there is no feeling in God, there can be no affection in Him. (From the Best Book I’ve Read. The doctrine of divine impassibility—in some form or other—is an inheritance of the Christian tradition. It is also the subject of much disagreement and debate within recent theology.

In this book, this debate is carried forward in a vigorous and very spirited manner as arguments are made from biblical and philosophical theology even as pastoral and experiential concerns are weighed.

DIVINE IMPASSIBILITY AND THE PASSION OF CHRIST IN THE BOOK OF HEBREWS KEVIN DEYOUNG I. Introduction It would be an understatement to say that, at present, divine impassibility as a dogma is not very fashionable (almost as out of fashion a dogma s the word itself).

The doctrine tha sayt s God does not suffer has almost completely lost its. Recent books that incorporate Christology within theology proper of divine impassibility include Rob Lister, God is Impassible and Impasssioned: Toward a Theology of Divine Emotion (Wheaton: Crossway, ) and Ronald S.

Baines, et. al., eds., Confessing the Impassible God: The Biblical Classical and Confessional Doctrine of Divine. Part 1: The Doctrine of Divine Impassibility in Historical Context 2.

Contextualizing Patristic Thought on Divine Impassibility: The Hellenization Hypothesis 3. Patristic Models of Divine Impassibility 4. Medieval and Reformational Reflections on Divine Impassibility 5.

Assessing the Widespread Rejection of Divine Impassibility in Modern. God Is Impassible and Impassioned: Toward a Theology of Divine Emotion By Rob Lister, Foreword by Bruce A.

Ware Modern theologians have focused on the doctrine of divine impassibility, exploring the significance of God’s emotional experience and most especially the question of divine suffering.

Rob Lister’s God Is Impassible and Impassioned is a compendious study of the difficult subject of divine impassibility. It is an informative book that surveys the eras of development and criticism of this doctrine starting from the Patristic era to the modern day.

While this doctrine still suffers from much misunderstanding in both passibilist and impassibilist camps, Lister does the church. Description: The book is structured as follows.

The Introduction presses home the importance of the doctrine of divine impassibility. Readers will be challenged to recognize that tinkering with divine impassibility as classically understood has implications that always end up compromising other fundamental articles of the Christian faith.Publisher's Description The book is structured as follows.

The Introduction presses home the importance of the doctrine of divine impassibility. Readers will be challenged to recognize that tinkering with divine impassibility as classically understood has implications that always end up .The doctrine of divine impassibility—in some form or other—is an inheritance of the Christian tradition.

It is also the subject of much disagreement and debate within recent theology. In this book, this debate is carried forward in a vigorous and very spirited manner as arguments are made from biblical and philosophical theology even as.